A retro Batman ‘66 poster by Tom Whalen, released by Mondo.

A retro Batman ‘66 poster by Tom Whalen, released by Mondo.

5 notes

A terrific Batman ‘66 print by Paul Shipper, released by Mondo.

A terrific Batman ‘66 print by Paul Shipper, released by Mondo.

7 notes

This art print is both silly and horrific - based on the classic scene in “The Thing”. “Just A Thing” By Taylor Blue

Shown at the Hero Complex Gallery. 

 http://hcgart.com/collections/imagined-worlds-2/products/just-a-thing-by-taylor-blue

This art print is both silly and horrific - based on the classic scene in “The Thing”. “Just A Thing” By Taylor Blue

Shown at the Hero Complex Gallery.

http://hcgart.com/collections/imagined-worlds-2/products/just-a-thing-by-taylor-blue

A very psychedelic poster for “Terminator” By VanOrton Design. It’s from the recent show at Hero Complex Galley. 

http://hcgart.com/collections/imagined-worlds-2/products/terminator-by-vanorton-design

A very psychedelic poster for “Terminator” By VanOrton Design. It’s from the recent show at Hero Complex Galley.

http://hcgart.com/collections/imagined-worlds-2/products/terminator-by-vanorton-design

A pretty cool art print by Chet Phillips shown at Hero Complex Gallery’s latest show. Unfortunately it’s sold out!

A pretty cool art print by Chet Phillips shown at Hero Complex Gallery’s latest show. Unfortunately it’s sold out!

A horrible thought!

I just had a horrible thought. What if a Timelord from Gallifrey fell out of the airlock of a space ship and died from suffocation from lack of air (or frozen to death).

Would he regenerate only to die all over again the same way?

Twelve times?!?

Apparently Fox Studio is releasing another comic movie - a spin off from the X-Men franchise. “Nightcrawler” stars Jake Gyllenhaal who replaces Alan Cumming who played the character in X2.

Apparently Fox Studio is releasing another comic movie - a spin off from the X-Men franchise. “Nightcrawler” stars Jake Gyllenhaal who replaces Alan Cumming who played the character in X2.

14 notes

BOOK OF LIFE

I saw the new animated movie “Book of Life” last night. It’s a Mexican themed movie that uses the idea of the Day of the Dead celebration as part of the story. 

From a technical point of view it’s beautiful - terrific art design and a unique style that doesn’t compare with other animated movies from Pixar, Disney or Dreamworks. The world of the film “looks” real - meaning as if it was done with models and stop motion animation - but I understand it’s entirely CGI. I thought it looked pretty good in 3D. 

There are a few supporting characters that looks a little grotesque to me but they fit within the story. 

The movie was produced by Guillermo Del Toro and has an international cast of voices including Zoe Saldana (Uhura), Channing Tatum (Magic Mike) and Diego Luna (Y Tu Mamá También). The supporting cast includes actors from the USA and Mexico and even Spain (opera star Placido Domingo). 

With most animated movies based on European fairy tales it’s nice to see something from another culture. I imagine “Book of Life” will be popular with all families but especially families from a Hispanic background. 

The movie has some original songs but it also borrows from the modern pop/rock library using snippets of songs from Elvis to Rod Stewart to Radiohead. I would have been interested in hearing the entire songs but according to the soundtrack listing they were only recorded for less than a minute each. 

The movie has a framing devise set in a modern day “American” museum and the rest of the story is told as a myth or fairy tale. This seemed unnecessary but perhaps the studio felt that American audience would need something familiar to acclimate to the cultural difference. 

But the story raised an interesting question in my mind. At what age do children understand the concepts of death and afterlife? Death is not unusual in cartoons. After all (spoiler alert) Bambi’s mother dies early in that film. But it’s may never actually be stated. 

In the “Book of Life” (it’s original working title was “Day of the Dead”) death plays an important role. There are two characters who are the personification of death and the main character gets bitten by a snake and travels to the underworld. 

Very young children won’t understand the story and older kids should be fine. But there is a middle group that might need their parents to help them understand what the story means. That’s not a conversation I would enjoy having. 

You can see the trailer here:http://youtu.be/NBw5YScs8iQ

4 out of 5 on the Frank-o-meter.

BOOK OF LIFE

I saw the new animated movie “Book of Life” last night. It’s a Mexican themed movie that uses the idea of the Day of the Dead celebration as part of the story.

From a technical point of view it’s beautiful - terrific art design and a unique style that doesn’t compare with other animated movies from Pixar, Disney or Dreamworks. The world of the film “looks” real - meaning as if it was done with models and stop motion animation - but I understand it’s entirely CGI. I thought it looked pretty good in 3D.

There are a few supporting characters that looks a little grotesque to me but they fit within the story.

The movie was produced by Guillermo Del Toro and has an international cast of voices including Zoe Saldana (Uhura), Channing Tatum (Magic Mike) and Diego Luna (Y Tu Mamá También). The supporting cast includes actors from the USA and Mexico and even Spain (opera star Placido Domingo).

With most animated movies based on European fairy tales it’s nice to see something from another culture. I imagine “Book of Life” will be popular with all families but especially families from a Hispanic background.

The movie has some original songs but it also borrows from the modern pop/rock library using snippets of songs from Elvis to Rod Stewart to Radiohead. I would have been interested in hearing the entire songs but according to the soundtrack listing they were only recorded for less than a minute each.

The movie has a framing devise set in a modern day “American” museum and the rest of the story is told as a myth or fairy tale. This seemed unnecessary but perhaps the studio felt that American audience would need something familiar to acclimate to the cultural difference.

But the story raised an interesting question in my mind. At what age do children understand the concepts of death and afterlife? Death is not unusual in cartoons. After all (spoiler alert) Bambi’s mother dies early in that film. But it’s may never actually be stated.

In the “Book of Life” (it’s original working title was “Day of the Dead”) death plays an important role. There are two characters who are the personification of death and the main character gets bitten by a snake and travels to the underworld.

Very young children won’t understand the story and older kids should be fine. But there is a middle group that might need their parents to help them understand what the story means. That’s not a conversation I would enjoy having.

You can see the trailer here:
http://youtu.be/NBw5YScs8iQ

4 out of 5 on the Frank-o-meter.

4 notes

Last night on Top Chef contestant Michael Patlazhan proved he was a loser in more than one way. After making a fishy tasting sweet soup that was panned by all the judges, he got kicked off. But in his partying interview he said that Judge/Mega Chef Tom Colicchio is too old for the job, adding, “Maybe Tom should be a little more open-minded?”  

Something tells me that Patlazhan isn’t just a dick on TV, he is a dick morning noon and night.

Last night on Top Chef contestant Michael Patlazhan proved he was a loser in more than one way. After making a fishy tasting sweet soup that was panned by all the judges, he got kicked off. But in his partying interview he said that Judge/Mega Chef Tom Colicchio is too old for the job, adding, “Maybe Tom should be a little more open-minded?”

Something tells me that Patlazhan isn’t just a dick on TV, he is a dick morning noon and night.